Skip to main content

About your Search

20121222
20121230
STATION
CSPAN 2
FBC 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
got medicaid payments by the government to help the state's struggling with their medicaid costs. $20 billion will able to spread across the states to help them because they were unable to meet the rising costs. in 2017, they're going to have a larger share of the costs. we need that is taken care of. they did not know what the cost was. they put a number in as a place holder and it looked like i was doing something for my state when i wasn't. i was trying to get it for all the states. that is what happened. i wanted to get it knocked out -- but if people wanted an opt out. the supreme court gave that. this got used against me as though i was trying to do something i should not have. i was not. the interesting thing is i was asked to do this by the nebraska governor. i did not get a thank you from another governor, who was from another state. >> during that time, you experienced the radio talk-show host circuit and the cable tv circuit. what was that time like and what do you think the echo chamber in american politics today does? >> it is a difficult thing to deal with. it is not jus
geithner. it could delay the tax filings. the government relies on august revenue to come in and it usually comes flooding in during march and april. people need to pay their taxes, but they don't know which tax rules will apply. host: the other deadline is the debt limit. here at $16.4 trillion. guest: >> the treasury department can stop funding federal pensions and do some other maneuvers, essentially to buy them another six weeks of time. we all at this last year. closer they get to that is when financial markets will start going crazy. the debates we are having now about tax and spending will likely be the same debates we are having six weeks from now. host: there's the u.s. debt clock. you can also see how much that is for individuals and what protection is moving ahead. our guest is damian paletta of the wall street journal. the covers finances and congress and the white house. his work is available online. from the senate floor yesterday, these comments by the senate democratic leader harry reid. [video clip] >> the speakership all members of the house back to washington today. he sh
" to postpone a government default. the government is on track to hit its borrowing limit on monday, he said with no prospect of congressional action to raise the limit. here now to help us unravel what's going on is todd zwillich. he's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international. todd, welcome back. decode this for us. are the players privately as bleak about the prospects as their public statement suggests? >> not as bleak, margaret, but bleaker than they were even a week ago and that's not terribly encouraging. the president as you reported is flying back to washington last night and some members of congress are coming back earlier than others. there will be some meetings here, there have to be some meetings between the principals and the president. there are a couple of options in the last couple of days even though it seems like five days is terribly, terribly short. there shall bills floating out there to keep tax rates where they're at for people making $250,000 and below. that could slide around. there's a senate bill that floats around. there's the pres
that problem? >> all we have to do to balance the budget in 10 years limit the growth of government spending so that the budget climbs by an average 2.5% a year. in my mind, this isn't about the short term because whatever speed bump we go over we're going to go over. in the long run that is what i'm worried about, how big is government? how much of our economy's resources will be diverted and consumed by government? because i don't want to become greece or france or one of these stagnant slow growth welfare states. think evidence is very clear that fiscal policy does matter for an economy's performance. doesn't mean we have a recession if taxes go up but it does mean that government will be bigger and our growth rate in the long run maybe instead of 2.7, it is 2.6. that doesn't sound like much but because of compounding it adds up. adam: dan, i don't think there is any danger we become greece or france in a lot of ways. we're not a socialist country yet and greece is a whole different ball of wax. rich, the discussion about the economy, the spending cuts that they're talking about do put peopl
year's was in 1996. that is, of course, when they were dealing with the government shut down. politics will be put aside this morning. the president, a lot of members of congress will be attending that memorial service for the late senator. >> kristen welker in hawaii. we will check in with you again later in our show. >>> from the fiscal cliff to gun control nra executive vice president was on "meet the press" this morning and here is part of what he said. >> i don't understand why you can't just for a minute imagine that when that horrible monster tried to shoot his way into sandy hook school that if a good guy with a gun would have been there he might have been able to stop it. >> nbc news editor is with me in the studio. there were armed guards at columbine. >> we know the nra is going to dig in. nothing is going to change until the other side can show that it can win these kinds of arguments. we saw this with environmental regulations in the 70s. you saw this in the 90s with the assault weapons ban. i think a lot of democrats got spooked after the mid 90s because so many of them l
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)